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WHITE CLOVER IS CAN BE IMPORTANT TO WILD POLLINATORS

Common Buckeye

     Common Buckeye

Recently while walking across my yard, I was stopped in my tracks by the sight of a common buckeye, bumblebee and honeybee visiting the white flowers blooming in a small island of white clover growing in the green sea of grass growing between my home office and barn.

Stumbling across these insects moving from flower to flower was a gentle reminder that, in spite of the fact that many consider white clover to be nothing more than a lawn weed, it can be important to a wide range of wild pollinators such as bees and butterflies.  In fact, in many yards it can be a major source of food.

In addition, white clover serves as a host plant for a number of moths and both the clouded and orange sulphur butterflies.

Realizing this, I will often refrain from mowing a few small patches of white clover until the plants have stopped blooming. I view this as an easy, inexpensive way to add a little bit of habitat diversity to my yard.

 

MAGAZINE PROMOTES NATIVE BEE CONSERVATION

The downward spiral of many of our native bee populations is something that we should all be concerned about. The plight of these insects was recently highlighted by a study conducted by researchers with the University of Vermont’s Grand Institute of Ecological Economics. Their findings suggest that between 2008 and 2013 native bee populations declined 23 percent across the United States.

If you would like to learn more about native bees and what you can do in your backyard to promote native bee populations, I strongly urge you to read the April-May issue of the National Wildlife Federation’s magazine National Wildlife.  This special issue is titled Garden For Wildlife – NURTURING NATIVE BEES.

NATIVE BEE