Archive | December 2019

A WEALTH OF INFORMATION CAN BE ACCESSED USING THE BLOG’S SEARCH ENGINE

       Did you know you can quickly access a wealth of information regarding backyard wildlife and plants without having to leave this blog?

       For example, if you would like information about bluebirds, coral honeysuckle or other backyard plant or animal, go to the bubble labeled SEARCH located in the right hand column.  All you have to do is type in the subject and hit return.  Instantly every blog that has been posted on the backyardwildlifeconnection dealing with that topic will appear.

       If you check it out, I think you will be surprised how much information is currently available to you. Also, this gives me insight and inspiration to write on various topics.

       If you have a backyard wildlife question or inquisitive about a certain subject, don’t forget to use the SEARCH!

Thank you to all who have been following my posts! Terry

BACKYARD SECRET-FEEDERS DON’T EXPOSE BIRDS TO MORE DANGER THAN THEY FACE ELSEWHERE

      We often hear it said feeding birds in our yards exposes wild birds to more danger than they face elsewhere. Have you ever wondered if this is true? According to Project FeederWatch, data collected by thousands of volunteers, such is not the case.

       Since 1987, the Cornell University Laboratory of Ornithology, Bird Studies Canada, the National Audubon Society, and the Canadian Nature Federation have joined hands to conduct a continent-wide survey to bird feeding. Each year more than 10,000 volunteers collect and submit data on the bird feeding activities in their yards.

       One of the many things the study has revealed is the birds that feed in our backyards are not facing any greater risks than they are exposed to at other locations. Project FeederWatch data have revealed that throughout the course of a winter, on the average, only one bird death per every two feeders takes place, for any reason (predation, disease, and accidents). This is considerably lower than the researchers’ prediction that at least four or five birds would die per feeder over the course of a winter. Actually, the mortality rate turned out to be a tenth of what was predicted.

       It is interesting to note, roughly 35-40% of all songbirds die annually.

       I sure you agree it is good to know our backyard feeders are far from death traps for the valued backyard neighbors.