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HUMMINGBIRDS ARE SWARMING TO SCARLET SAGE

      Having studied hummingbirds for decades, I have learned the folks that usually attract the most birds to their yards are those that plant a wide variety of flowering plants that offer the birds plenty of food from spring through fall; supplemented with sugar water served in feeders.  There is no better time to witness this than August. 

       I say this because hummingbirds are more abundant in our yards right now than they have been at any time earlier this year.  As such, if you have planted a wide variety of nectar-laden plants, this is a great time to see which of these plants these tiny-feathered jewels favor during the heat of summer.  The abundance of hummingbirds gives you the opportunity to assess their food preferences in a very short period.

       For years, my wife and I have been planting a host of different plants for hummingbirds.  Right now, by far, the plant most often visited by hummingbirds is scarlet sage (Salvia coccinea).  This Georgia native produces an abundance of scarlet red one-inch long tubular-shaped flowers.

       We are growing scarlet sage in flowerbeds with companion plants such as black-eyed Susans, purple coneflower, zinnia, blanket flower, and cosmos.  We also have it planted in containers on our deck.  Some containers contain nothing other than scarlet sage.  However, since it produces an abundance of seed, some of the seeds dropped last year somehow found their way into nearby pots where my wife is rooting buddleia and roses.  Additionally, scarlet sage has volunteered in containers where she scattered the seeds of zinnias, blanket flowers, and black-eyed Susans this spring.  Scarlet sage is growing well there too.

       From morning to dusk, hummingbirds repeatedly visit the scarlet sage blooms more often than those of lantana, zinnia, trumpet creeper, Turk’s cap, purple salvia, hosta, Mexican sunflower, and other hummingbird favorites.  This plant has literally become a hummingbird magnet.

       While I thoroughly enjoy watching rubythroats feeding at scarlet sage blooms planted about the yard, I especially enjoy those growing in containers on our deck.  Regardless of whether I am working on the deck or sitting nearby the plants enjoying a cup of coffee and having the birds feed a few feet away.

       If you do not have as much hummingbird activity around the flowering plants blooming in your yard right now, I suggest you begin planting hummingbird food plants.  By including them in your gardens, next year your yard will be more beautiful, hummingbirds will have more food choices and the numbers of hummers using your yard should increase.  Now that is called a win, win, win situation.

        

BACKYARD SECRET: THE WITH THE GREATEST VOLUME OF NECTAR MAY BE GROWING IN YOUR YARD

       Can you name the plant that displays flowers that contain the greatest volume of nectar?  It is not Mexican cigar, red hot poker, Turk’s cap  or one of the scores of other alien plants we plant in our gardens to attract hummingbirds and butterflies.  You might be surprised to learn it is a native woody vine known as trumpet creeper (Campsis radicans)

       The woody vine’s orange blossoms are so popular with hummingbirds it is often sold in the nursery trade as hummingbird vine.

       This plant commonly grows in yards across the state.  However, in many cases it is considered a weed and not recognized as a valuable hummingbird food plant.  The reason for this is it will climb on houses and other manmade structures.  However, if you plant it alongside an arbor, trellis, or fence away from a building, it can be an asset instead of a liability.  Trumpet creep can also be trained to take on the form of a small tree.

BACKYARD SECRET: BIRDS ARE FANS OF POKEBERRIES

        Pokeweed is one of the many plants homeowners often refer to as weeds.  These objects of our distain try to grow in alongside our precious cultivated plants, invade our lawns, and are generally viewed of as nuisances.  However, some of these plants may be more valuable than you think.  One such plant is pokeweed. 

       Other than the few folks that dine on the plants tender shoots in the spring, pokeweed is not a plant most people allow to grow in their backyards.  This is unfortunate because, if allow to grow in the right spot it produces a bounty of dark purple berries that are relished by more than 50 species of birds.  Among the backyard favorites the devour pokeberries are cardinals, mourning doves, mockingbirds, and bluebirds.  The berries also provide nourishment for fall migrants such as thrushes and vireos that pass through our backyards on their fall migration.

       Although pokeberries are often considered a fall food, they are just beginning to ripen in my backyard.  This event caught the attention of a mockingbird.  Although the vast majority of the pokeberries in my backyard are still green, as soon as one turns dark purple the mockingbird gobbles it up.

       I must admit I remove pokeberries from some of my flower gardens.  Meanwhile, I let me grow in idle spots and in the shrubby borders that define the north and south sides of my yard.

       If a pokeberry takes root in a similar spot in your yard, I urge you to let it grow.  It will provide your avian neighbors with an important source of food later in the year.

ATTRACTING THE SUMMER TANAGER TO YOUR YARD IN SUMMER

       Now that summer has officially arrived, days are getting shorter with each passing day.  When this occurs many migratory birds beginning putting on the fat that will fuel the migration to their wintering grounds.  One such bird is the summer tanager.

       The summer tanager is a common resident of wooded backyards across the state.  However, in spite of the fact, males are cloaked in red feathers and the females display a two-toned plumage (olive-green above, yellow below) and sport large pale bills, this colorful bird often goes unnoticed.  This is because it often feeds in the tops of trees.

       The summer tanager primarily consumes lots of insects such as bees, wasps, cicadas, yellow jackets and grasshoppers throughout the spring and early summer.  However, throughout much of the summer as it is packing on fat in preparation for their autumn migration, fifty percent or more of its diet consists of fruits and berries. 

       Consequently, if you would like to attract local and migrating summer tanagers to your backyard at this time of the year, the best way to do that is to provide them with the fruits and berries they relish.  If you look around your yard and cannot find any of the plants that produce this much-needed food, you should make every effort to add some of them to your landscape.

       Here are some of the plants that provide fruits and berries gobbled up by summer tanagers as they prepare before they embark on their long flight to Central and South America:  blueberry, blackberry, grape, hawthorn, flowering dogwood, rough-leaf dogwood, pokeberry, and black gum.

BACKYARD SECRET: SUNFLOWERS HELP THWART BEE DECLINES

       The demise of bee populations across the country is a major concern.  The economic and ecological impact of declining populations of these pollinators is staggering.  For years, scientists have been diligently trying to determine both the causes and solutions to this problem.  The findings of a study recently published in Scientific Reports suggest the sunflower may provide a glimmer of hope for some species of bees.

        The study investigated the possible impacts of diets of two species of bees containing various pollens on populations of two of the parasites linked to high bee mortality and sluggish colony growth.  The study reported European honeybees and common bumblebees that fed on the pollen produced in the flowers of sunflower plants were less infected with these parasites than bees that did not consume sunflower pollen.

        In the words of Rebecca Irwin (one of the biologists that conducted the study), “We tried other monofloral pollens, but we seem to have hit the jackpot with sunflower pollen.”

        Although this discovery is promising, the biologists that conducted the study were quick to point that, since sunflower pollen is low in both protein and some amino acids, the bees cannot live on sunflower pollen alone.  As such, they need to supplement their diets with the pollen of a variety of other pollen-producing plants.

        Consequently, if we homeowners want to help in the fight to thwart the ravages brought about by two of the deadly parasites that plague our bee populations, we need to add sunflowers to the variety of other pollen- rich plants growing in our backyard.  I am please to say sunflowers are currently blooming in my backyard.  I hope you will find a place for them in your backyard too.

BEE BALM IS A GREAT NATIVE HUMMINGBIRD NECTAR PLANT

    Soon hummingbirds will be en route to Georgia.  As such, there is no better time than now to begin planning what to plant for the feathered dynamos that bring us so much please.  With that in mind, I would like to suggest that you consider planting bee balm.

        Bee balm (Monarda didyma), also known as Oswego tea) is a native perennial.  This hummingbird favorite grows anywhere from one to five feet tall.  It grows best in moist to well drained soil types.  The plant blooms best when grown in sites that vary from partial shade to full sun.  Bee balm blooms from March to May.

BACKYARD SECRET: Coneflowers Are Great For Wildlife And People Too

        The coneflower’s value to wildlife is widely recognized.  It is a source of food for native pollinators such as native bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds.  In addition, long after its blooms fade, American goldfinches and other birds feed on the plant’s prickly seeds.

       Those of us that plant this plant in our gardens enjoy the beauty of it uniquely shaped, colorful flowers.  However, according to many herbalists, the value of this plant to humans may go far beyond its pleasing appearance.  It has been purported to be beneficial in treating a wide variety of ailments.  For example, it has been reported that chemicals found in the coneflower a natural antibiotic and even enhance white blood cell counts.

       While I cannot substantiate claims of its medicinal values, I can attest to its value to wildlife.  This year, for example, my wife and I enjoyed watching bumblebees and carpenter bees daily visiting the blooms of coneflowers growing in our backyard.   In addition, the flowers produced by these plants were particularly popular with common buckeyes.   In fact, this year we saw more common buckeyes on coneflowers than any other plant growing in our backyard.  Numerous times, a single flower hosted four or more buckeyes.  

BACKYARD SECRET: DOGWOOD BLOSSOMS ARE NOT WHITE

To generations of Georgians, and all of the other folks that consider the blossom of flowering dogwood to be a symbol of spring, it might come as a surprise to learn that an argument can be made the flowers of this iconic tree are not actually white.

       The experts base this claim on the fact that the creamy, white petals that are the focal point of one of Nature’s most beautiful floral creations are not petals at all.  These petal-like structures are technically bracts.  The tree’s small flowers form the greenish-yellow button-like structure located at the center of the bracts.

       Although, I know plant experts are correct in making a distinction between bracts and petals, I am also certain the most people will continue to believe flowering dogwood flowers are white and not yellow.

 

BACKYARD SECRET: GREENBRIER PROVIDES FOOD FOR BACKYARD BIRDS

 Most Georgia homeowners are not fans of greenbrier.  Greenbrier vines constantly try to smother our shrubs, trees, and gardens.  Whenever we get near them, their thorny vines seemly try to leap out and snag our clothing or prick our skin.  However, would you belief this menacing native vine is a source of winter food for backyard birds?  It is true.

       Greenbrier’s shiny dark berries are gobbled up by more than 40 species of songbirds including backyard favorites such as the hermit thrush, American robin, northern flicker, northern mockingbird, gray catbird, northern cardinal, and sparrows.

THE WILDLIFE CHRISTMAS TREE

If you were asked to name four plants that are associated with Christmas, what would you say?  You could not go wrong if you listed the holly, poinsettia, mistletoe, and the Christmas tree.  All of these plants will always be inexorably linked to this special holiday.  However, in the hearts and minds of most Americans, the plant that symbolizes Christmas more than any other is the Christmas tree.

       Each year millions of Americans center their celebration of this special holiday around the Christmas tree.  A number of different kinds of trees are used as Christmas trees.  According to The National Christmas Tree Foundation, the ten most popular Christmas trees are, in descending order of popularity,  the Frazer fir, Douglas fir, Colorado blue spruce, Scotch pine, eastern red-cedar, white spruce, eastern white pine and Virginia pine.

       However, throughout much of the 20th century, for most Georgians, the Christmas tree of choice was the eastern red cedar.  Most of us refer to this evergreen tree as simply cedar.  The tree is abundant, has a natural “Christmas tree” shape, and fills a room with the pleasant aroma of cedar.

       Nowadays, the popularity of the cedar has waned.  Some folks are buying artificial numbers fabricated from aluminum or plastic.  The majority of those that still use a natural tree are choosing firs, spruces, pines, or Leyland cypresses over the cedar.   

       Fortunately, for our backyard wildlife neighbors, eastern red cedars are showing up in home landscapes with increasing regularity.  This is due in large part to tree’s attractive conical shape, resistance to disease and drought and low maintenance.  It should not be overlooked that it is also so valuable to wildlife and deserves the title of The Wildlife Christmas Tree.  

       Unfortunately, in spite of the fact that the eastern red cedar provides wildlife with food, nesting sites and protection from the elements and predators, its importance to wildlife is rarely appreciated.

       This native cedar can be found growing throughout most of the eastern United States.  It ranges across 37 states from as far north as New England south to Georgia and west to Texas.  It is a common tree throughout most of Georgia, with the exception of our coastal counties.

       This is the cedar commonly found growing around abandoned house sites, vintage homes, and old cemeteries and along fence lines.

       The eastern red cedar is an extremely adaptable plant.  It can be found with its roots sunk into the damp flood plains that hug our rivers all the way to dry, red clay hilltops.  About the only place is does not do well is under a heavy forest canopy.

       More often than not, the cedars we see growing in fencerows have been unknowingly planted by birds.  Cedar seeds are very hard and often pass unscathed through a bird’s digestive system.  When a bird perches on a fence and leaves behind a dropping containing cedar seeds, the hard seeds often germinate and eventually become a young tree.

       Eastern red cedar trees are ideally suited for most yards.  These long-lived (300+ years), slow-growing evergreen trees can reach a height of 60 feet or more and measure two feet in diameter.

       Here in the Peach State, eastern red cedars bloom in February and March.  Small (1/4″) fleshy, greenish, blue berry-like cones mature from October to December.  Each cone usually contains two hard seeds.  The cones often persist until the following March.  This is extremely important as they provide food for wildlife throughout the winter when food is often hard to come by.

       One of the great things about red cedars is that they can be relied upon to fruit annually.  Bumper crops are produced every second or third year.

       Hosts of animals eat eastern red cedar foliage and fruits.  For example, both rabbits and deer will consume the foliage.

       More than two dozen birds dine on eastern red cedar fruits.  This impressive list includes such backyard favorites as the American robin, northern mockingbird, brown thrasher, mourning dove, eastern bluebird, and cedar waxwing.  As you might expect, cedar waxwings are extremely fond of this winter food.  The berry-like cones are also eaten by wild turkeys and quail.  Coyotes, opossums, chipmunks, and even armadillos consume them.

       The tree is also the host plant for the beautiful, petite juniper hairstreak butterfly.  This often-elusive butterfly spends its entire life in close proximity to cedar trees.  Females lay their eggs on the cedars.  Upon hatching, the caterpillars eat cedar foliage.

       Even the adults are invariably found on the trees.  Often the only way that you can hope to see a juniper hairstreak is to tap on the trunk of a cedar tree.  If the butterflies are present, they will briefly fly upwards before settling back into the thick, green foliage again.

       A number of birds build their nests in cedar trees including northern cardinals, brown thrashers, northern mockingbirds, American robins, and common grackles.

       The tree’s dense foliage makes it ideally suited for escape cover.  Birds will often fly into cedars to escape pursuing hawks.  Also, cedar trees provide protection against rain, snow, and sleet.  In fact, during the winter, the interior of a cedar tree provides an ideal roosting spot on cold, blustery winter nights.  At least 21 species of birds use the trees as roosting sites.

       Some of the birds known to roost there are chipping sparrows, northern cardinals, wild turkeys, and eastern screech owls.

       I strongly suspect wintering hummingbirds such as the rufous hummingbird also roosts in these trees since I often find that they are frequently the only good roosting sites available in yards frequented by these western migrants.

       It appears that the eastern red cedar may never again be the most popular Christmas tree in the Georgia.  However, the fact it is prospering throughout the state and is even becoming an integral part of backyard landscapes insures that this tree will remain an important wildlife plant well into the future.

       On Christmas eve, when I look at the my Christmas tree surrounded by lovingly wrapped presents, I will find it comforting to know that not too far from my backdoor stands my large wildlife Christmas tree.  Although no colored lights hang from its spreading boughs, on the ground beneath it, there will be untold numbers of tiny blue nutrient-rich presents ready to be discovered on Christmas day by my hungry wildlife neighbors.  And when I pull up the covers and drift off into sleep, I will know that the birds roosting in the tree are protected from the harshest winter weather.

       If you are planning to build a new home on a site where one or more eastern red cedars are growing, leave them standing.  On the other hand, if no cedars are growing in your yard, plant one or more.  In either case, you will be giving your wildlife neighbors gifts that never stop giving.

 

  As such, by offering our backyard neighbors with a dependable source of food, nesting sites, and cover, it deserves to be called the wildlife Christmas tree.

© Terry W. Johnson originally published in “The Out My Backdoor” column featured in Georgia Wild E-Newsletter

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