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INSIGHT INTO HUMMINGBIRD PREDATORS

       One of the things I most enjoy about writing a blog is receiving feedback from my fellow bloggers.  These comments have definitely enhanced my knowledge of wildlife. 

       With that in mind, I want to share with you a message I received from a blogger that lives in southern Mexico.  The communication was prompted by a recent blog dealing with gray rat snakes feeding on hummingbirds at a backyard bird feeder.  The response to this posting provided me with a better understanding of the predators that feed on hummingbirds outside the boundaries of the United States.  As you will learn, hummingbirds that live in this part of the world as well as hummers that winter south of the United States have to contend with predators, the likes of which few Georgians have ever imagined.

      Blogger Pelicanbreath wrote,  “I live in southern Mexico and saw a juvenile Mexican spiny-tailed iguana eating a hummingbird on the windowsill next to a feeder.  I of course chased it away and then had to chase it away from two other feeders within the next two days (it’s missing part of its tail so it’s easy to spot).  Since then, I’ve seen the lizard around but never near a feeder.

       I’ve also had a problem with Ferruginous Pigmy-Owl predation.  I’d seen them in the tree next to my house almost daily for years and I only recall one attempt to hawk a bird from a feeder.  That is, until a pair of them fledged in the same tree – and grew up surrounded by hummingbirds.  Since then, I’ve seen the owls take over ten hummingbirds.”

THERE IS A SNAKE ON MY HUMMINGBIRD FEEDER!

       How would like to look out your window and spot a snake wrapped around your hummingbird feeder?  This is just what recently happened to Upson County blogger Wanda Granitz.

       Needless to say, the rat snake dangling from her feeder was not visiting to partake in a sip of nectar.  It was attempting to grab a hummingbird or two. 

       Like most predators, snakes are very opportunistic.  Whenever they locate a concentration of prey, they will try to take advantage of the situation whether they find an abundance of frogs, insects, mice, or hummingbirds.

       There are many other critters that capture hummingbirds.  These predators include bullfrogs, hawks, shrikes, cats, praying mantises, spiders, and others.  However, aside from cats we rarely see hummingbirds capture one of these flying jewels.

       Fortunately, for hummingbirds and their devoted fans, the unnerving sight of a snake curled around a feeder is not common.  If you are like me, you have never witnessed anything like this in your yard.  In fact, in all the years I worked as a wildlife biologist, I received only a handful of reports of snakes trying to feed on hummingbirds visiting a feeder.

       However, if you do happen to spot a rat snake on your hummingbird feeder, one of the best things you can do to protect the hummers is capture the snake and move it some distance from your home.  Do not simply release it elsewhere in your yard.  If you do, chances are it will return to dine on these flying delicacies at a later time.

WHY DO CROWS DIP THEIR FOOD IN WATER?

         If American crows frequent your backyard, chances are you have witnessed them dipping food into a birdbath.  Whenever we witness such behavior, we cannot help but wonder why a bird would go to the trouble of soaking a piece of food in water before gulping it down.

        The truth of the matter is we are not absolutely sure fully understand the reason behind this behavior or why they do not do it all of the time.  The most widely held theory is it is done to soften their food.  This theory explains why they might dunk a hard, dry chunk of dog food or stale bread in water.  However, for the life of me, I cannot see how this explanation explains why American crows also place dead animals such as birds and mice, animal bones, snails and even bits and pieces of roadkill in birdbaths. 

        Others suggest nesting crows dip bakery products and pet food in water prior to subsequently feeding them to their nestlings for a couple of reasons.  First of all, it makes the food more palatable for their young.  It is also is an easy way for adult birds to provide their youngsters with water.

        Regardless, it is always a good idea to clean a birdbath that has been used as a “dipping” station by crows.  Invariably, whenever crows are dipping their food in our birdbaths, it is very likely they are leaving behind bacteria and fungi that were clinging to the food.  These microorganisms could be harmful to the birds that will later use the water to bathe and drink.  

A HERMIT THRUSH FOR CHRISTMAS

After Ron Lee sent me a series of pictures of a hermit thrush, I immediately knew what I wanted for Christmas — a hermit thrush showing up at my backyard feeders.

       Although this thrush winters throughout Georgia, it is not a bird that frequents our feeders.  The exception to this rule is Ron and Jennie Lee’s backyard.  The Lees have hosted a hermit thrush in their backyard for several winters.

       These winter visitors are drawn out of the thick shrubs surrounding his year by cornbread that is scattered on the ground.

       The bird that has made the Lee’s backyard its home this winter has become exceptionally tame.  When Ron goes out into the yard to replenish the cornbread the thrush will suddenly appear and begin feeding.

       Ron says that a ruby-crowned kinglet has also developed a taste for cornbread.

       My wife and I have been feeding cornbread to the birds for many years.  Although this delicacy is regularly eaten by mockingbirds and other backyard diners, we have never attracted a hermit thrush. 

       Hermit thrushes are known to feed on the ground and in elevated feeders such as bird tables and trays.

       Aside from cornbread, they are also known to eat sliced apples, doughnuts, cracked corn, pieces of pecans, suet, and peanut butter.  White bread is also listed among the foods consumed by hermit thrushes.  However, Ron reports that when he has tried to offer his hermit thrush small pieces of white bread, the bird tosses them aside and seeks out the cornbread.

       Over the years, I have tried all of these feeder offerings without success.  I guess I need to see if Ron and Jennie will share their cornbread recipe with me.  In the meantime, I hope Santa will bring me a Christmas hermit thrush.

GARDEN CLUB TO HOLD GARDENING STUDY SCHOOL

MALE EASTERN BLUEBIRD

MALE EASTERN BLUEBIRD

The Augusta Council of Garden Clubs,  in association with the National Garden Clubs, The Garden Club of Georgia and the Azalea District of the Garden Club of Georgia is presenting Course I of the Gardening Study School.  The school will be held  at Phinizy Swamp Nature Park September 23-24, 2016.

       This intensive course will focus  on a number of topics relating to the world in which we live including environmental issues, networking and outreach, plant biodiversity, backyard wildlife habitat, historical actions and leaders, ecology, environmental science and sustainability.

       I will be will be teaching the session on backyard wildlife habitats.  My talk will deal with all facets relating to creating and maintaining diverse populations of birds, wild pollinators and plants in backyard settings.

       Although the study school is designed for members of the Garden Club of Georgia wanting to attain recognition as an Accredited Environmental Consultant, the courses are open to the general public. http://augustacouncilgc.com/index.html For more information as to how you can  attend the section dealing with backyard wildlife habitats, or the entire course, contact:  Judith Kirkland at jukirkland@knology.net.

      

FAWNS SERENELY RESTING IN A BACKYARD

Twin white-tailed deer fawns

Twin white-tailed deer fawns

Over the years, Ron and Jennie Lee have been transforming their McDonough backyard into a haven for wildlife.

Since they live in the shadow Atlanta, some would say that they have been wasting their time. According to these naysayers, if you want to attract wildlife to your yard, you need to live out in the country.

Ron and Jennie’s success in inviting wildlife to their yard is a shining example of what can often be accomplished in some of the most unlikely locations. The variety of wildlife that regularly visits their yard is truly astounding.

For that reason, I was not surprised when Ron recently sent me a picture of a couple of his latest backyard visitors. I hope you enjoy the photograph as much as I do.