HOW TO CATCH A GLIMPSE OF AN ORCHARD ORIOLE IN YOUR BACKYARD

       If the truth were known, the orchard oriole is far more common around Georgia backyards than most people think. 

       I believe three of the reasons for this are that this colorful, small oriole rarely makes an appearance at bird feeders, most people are not familiar with its song, and finally, far too many folks do not maintain a birdbath.

       My wife and I are fortunate that orchard orioles annually make their spring and summer home in our backyard. In fact, throughout the spring the song of the orchard oriole can be heard throughout the entire day.  Consequently, when we hear the birds singing, we focus our attention on the trees or shrubs where the calls are coming from.  Often we are rewarded with seeing one of the birds suddenly burst from the foliage and fly across the yard.

       One of the best ways to learn the song is by listening to it on one of the many online sites that allow you to listen to recordings of the various birdcalls. 

       Once you becoming familiar with the call, you may discover that you are already hosting orchard orioles. 

       Some say that they are able to catch a glimpse of orchard orioles visiting their hummingbird feeders.  We have never been that lucky.  If you want to try it, here is a suggestion that may work.  Hang up a hummingbird feeder that is equipped with large feeding portals.

       The reason I mention this is last winter a Baltimore oriole fed at a hummingbird feeder that has large feeding portals.  When I replaced it with a feeder with normal-sized feeding portals, the bird would not use it; obliviously they were too small.  Perhaps this approach will work with orchard orioles too.

       By far, we get our best views of orchard orioles at our birdbaths.  Orchard orioles visit these watering holes daily.  With that in mind, keep your birdbaths full of fresh, clean water.

       If orioles are not regularly using your birdbaths, it may be because they are too deep.  Orchard orioles are not large birds.  As such, they will not wade out into water a couple of inches deep.  Ideally, a birdbath should have a gently sloping bottom that provides birds of all sizes with ideal bathing conditions.

       If you are successful in catching a glimpse of an orchard oriole or two using one of these tips, please let me know.

 

One thought on “HOW TO CATCH A GLIMPSE OF AN ORCHARD ORIOLE IN YOUR BACKYARD

  1. I saw orchard orioles in the spring when I lived in Swainsboro. They would feed on the nectar of standing cypress flowers and mimosa blooms. Fun to watch!

    Like

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